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Author Topic: shocked at the prices!  (Read 1029 times)
chippyzip
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« on: March 12, 2018, 18:36:50 »

Hi,

I've successfully fitted a new belt and DR Pulley 19g rollers! It wasn't difficult mechanically wise, but I was shocked at how flimsy the plastic parts are while working on it! For example, I noticed that during last year, the plastic wing piece  https://www.easyparts.nl/showdrawing/19642/142625/713B/0-4019-1-m420-m15057-m19642-s19647-d142625/Front-shield.html  (part No 6) complete flap left had snapped off somehow. No problem, I thought, they can't be much to buy new! But this web site is selling the part for 87.53 euros! I'm shocked at the price of this piece of plastic!

Does anyone know of any scrap dealers selling parts for the X10 500cc??

Graham  
« Last Edit: March 14, 2018, 19:27:44 by Mottza » Logged

Piaggio X10 500cc executive
Mike H
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« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2018, 19:11:45 »

There are so few X10's in the UK I don't hold out much hope.

But yeah many X10 plastic bits are incredibly fragile and fabulously priced. The cynic in me is convinced that the snap-in tab fastenings are designed to snap off easily on purpose, so you got to get a whole new panel.

After I'd chucked the blue X10 across a flyover exit (and before discovering the frame damage would make it a write off) I thought I could patch it up myself and so I had costed up and actually ordered nearly £800 worth of body panels and associated plastic bits. even the chrome flash on each of the rear quarter panels, described as "crash protector" I think (  ...? ) was like 65 quid. (For one.) A few inches length of dull chromed moulding.

I also noted at the time the price of that transparent bit, as I also would have needed one too. I also observed how especially vulnerable it is. Bike just falls over off the stand, say, it'll smash.  Yep that'll be 87 Euros please.

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Murphy's 4th law of motion states that any small object that is accidentally dropped will immediately hide itself under a larger object.
roadster
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« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2018, 08:41:37 »

It has long been the practice of the automotive industry to price accident vulnerable parts so that insurance companies would have to fork out huge sums for repairs. It has the double benefit that perfectly sound older vehicles are far more likely to be written off, thus encouraging the purchase of a replacement vehicle. The insurance companies wised up to this a long time ago and put extreme pressure on manufacturers to curtail the practice by threatening much higher premiums on particular makes, this being particularly significant to fleet buyers. Of course for low volume markets such as scooters the insurance companies don't have much clout so the same old practices still go on. None of the major players involved want you to ride old vehicles and that includes government agencies who insist on ever tightening MOT test requirements etc.
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Gav
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« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2018, 16:57:14 »

Well except vehicles over 40 years old are MOT exempt after May 2018. However The London Mayor is actually banning em in the London City environs and hyking the fees for younger timer ones.

I thought my Aprilia Atlantic was ready for the road again after my deciding to entrust it to the local Aprilia shop. Everything fixeed they thought, except when the mechanic took it for a road test something was draining the battery.
 It seemed to come down to either rectifyer or Stator-both listed at over £90. OK without it seemed the Scoot was not the bargain I bought a couple of years back however that said as the boss at the place had a Nexus Regulator that wasnt the problem, on the Gilera it was got for that seems to have rectified the problem and they havent charged(no puns intended)me for that or the labour to change it.
Hoping to get a load of use on it now.

ps I needed a starter relay for my Ape Mille and double checked after the insulated screwdriver test, by swapping the identical one from the Futura I still had then. As it was around Christmas there was no urgency I saw one on Fleabay £8 quid from China-it took 3 weeks to arrive and is still on the bike 3 years on. Perhaps when the Fut was recovered home before going away to the knackers yard as it wouldnt start at first I couldnt be bothered to bung the old faulty Mille one -actually they are different on the pair of Cagiva Raptors with Suzuki TLs mechanics,I have since owned, as after the Scottish run last year on the non V spec naked one ,it had struggled a bit to start in the mornings,maybe after several torrential rain dousings.

Folk slag off Italian stuff particularly electrics but generally I have had very little trouble with their 2 wheeled products. I have a rear  light unit and rack for the newer type Atlanics-125/500s if anyone needs such.
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Dave Milnes
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« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2018, 21:29:42 »

Italian electrics are like Chinese electronics, quite clever and inventive but can sometimes be badly put together. It isn't unknown for Italian wiring to be not solid copper strand but copper tinned aluminium strand which has a higher resistance, but is just as conductive and a lot cheaper. The problem is when you come to solder a joint, it just dissolves away at the touch of an iron and won't take solder. Most Italian looms are dry crimped, and I have found in old wiring twisted dry joints with no hint of solder just shrink wrapped and taped into the loom. OK until the loom gets a bending or a bit of stretching or soaked in water. Mostly they are OK unless you try to alter them or tap into them then the trouble starts.
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chippyzip
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« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2018, 15:44:40 »

" I also noted at the time the price of that transparent bit, as I also would have needed one too. I also observed how especially vulnerable it is. Bike just falls over off the stand, say, it'll smash.   Yep that'll be 87 Euros please."

Yep, that's how mine broke, I reckon, when from standing on some loose tarmac in a car park, and we both toppled off the thing, with not one person helping to get the bloody thing back off the ground!

What glue is recommended to fix the broken plastic parts? Gorilla Glue??

Graham 
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Piaggio X10 500cc executive
Mike H
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« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2018, 12:55:21 »

I have used Araldite quite successfully.
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Murphy's 4th law of motion states that any small object that is accidentally dropped will immediately hide itself under a larger object.
Techno
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« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2018, 17:19:27 »

I have used Araldite quite successfully.

Same here works a treat, but they're are more than likely to brake off again when you've got to pull them/it off for servicing. 

I good tip is to get some of the car body trim tools, they're like a load of oddly shaped plastic and metal pry bars.  They work a treat allowing you to slowly and with even pressure either side of the spring clips remove the trim.   
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roadster
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« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2018, 07:32:06 »

Same here works a treat, but they're are more than likely to brake off again when you've got to pull them/it off for servicing. 

I good tip is to get some of the car body trim tools, they're like a load of oddly shaped plastic and metal pry bars.  They work a treat allowing you to slowly and with even pressure either side of the spring clips remove the trim.   
Old store cards or credit cards are also good for  prising at plastic panels.
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Mike H
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« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2018, 19:47:28 »

Same here works a treat, but they're are more than likely to brake off again when you've got to pull them/it off for servicing. 
Absolutely right.

Helps greatly to grease the spring clips, also replace any rusty ones.

I have even found broken ones that broke in situ while still assembled! 

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Murphy's 4th law of motion states that any small object that is accidentally dropped will immediately hide itself under a larger object.
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