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Author Topic: Cleaning the X10 350 airfilter  (Read 4593 times)
Globs
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« on: February 07, 2015, 17:59:34 »

Ok, I've been wanting to do this for a while as I suspected it had been over-oiled at the last (first!) service, but hadn't figured out how to get to it until now. I know - pretty sad when most scooters air-filters are just there in front of you. However it's not that difficult once you know how:

1) Remove under-seat contents and carpet, then undo the big access hatch over the engine.
2) Remove the screw between the fairing panels just next to the back of the filter.
3) Remove the two 8mm bolts holding the filter to the scooter.
4) Loosen the three hand-turned filter screws (hidden by the fairing). Leave them in (they are stuck), just get them completely loose.
5) Unscrew the other air filter screws (phillips screws) and remove.

Now the clever bit - remember you just want to get to the element, so jiggle the cover so the top two hand-turned screws are clear of the fairing. The third will still be stuck but don't worry, draw the whole cover toward the back and the ground and turn it toward you as it comes out - which will allow the final third one to appear.

Now just reach in and take out the washable filter. You can now wash it in washing up liquid. Dry with paper towels and leave to dry well. If you choose to oil it (they are supposed to be oiled) do it VERY lightly (with a 50-50 mixed spray of petrol and filter oil) or the oil will clog it and your performance will be much reduced.






The actual filter appears to be top quality and of a really good design - top marks to Piaggio for that.
Remember to put the hand-screws in before refitting the cover - there is no way to get them in after unless you have the fairing off.



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« Last Edit: February 08, 2015, 00:07:02 by Globs » Logged
Mike H
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« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2015, 18:19:45 »

What was the verdict re whether it was over-oiled or not?

If it was too much, the excess should drain into the domed plastic cup thingy at below rear that's held on with a sprung hose clamp, and you are supposed to check it occasionally to see if it needs emptying.

Don't forget also the engine breather throws its output onto the inside of the element, so there's that as well.

On mine so far it's leaked out past the casing / element seals onto the transmission case below, so so much for the catcher cup thingy!

HTH

PS: when I looked at mine, appeared to be completely dry.



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Mike H
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« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2015, 18:28:39 »

Now just reach in and take out the washable filter. You can now wash it in washing up liquid. Dry with paper towels and leave to dry well. If you choose to oil it (they are supposed to be oiled) do it VERY lightly (with a 50-50 mixed spray of petrol and filter oil) or the oil will clog it and your performance will be much reduced.

According to service manual you should always oil it, then squeeze out any excess. As I said above any further excess should drain into the catcher cup, just by gravity.

By the way I bought a second filter element as a spare (so you can have one ready to put on straightaway rather than wait until you've washed and dried the one you've taken out) and it came already oiled, and quite thoroughly must be said. Not lightly at all.

I took this one straight out of its bag and put it on the bike as is, wringing wet, no performance problems have ensued.

HTH

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Globs
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« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2015, 18:59:49 »

Interesting stuff Mike - especially about your filter being wet. Filter oil is actually sticky IME - not wet, so I wonder if they used a different oil?

This is what the manual says - dab it on with a brush? Maybe it loses in translation.





I'll give it a run tomorrow to work and see what the MPG figures tell me. The 'over-oiled air filter' theory was offered by the chief Piaggio man at the recent Motorcycle Live show, when I was asking why I lost 10mpg at my 600 mile service. I've also heard (from other sources) in some bikes an over oiled filter can even prevent the bike from running - plus that filter foam is very fine in the X10.

If it runs just as before I may check the valve clearances - they can have a big effect on MPG too. With the seat and seat access panel off it's actually pretty good access to the rocker cover so it's actually fairly easy for me to check.

I'll let you know!
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Mike H
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« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2015, 20:05:31 »

Ah OK it's 50/50 petrol and 'specified oil', and then on next page recommended product: 'AGIP FILTER OIL Special product for the treatment of foam filters.' Bear in mind the petrol will evaporate and disappear, so is only used as a solvent, as it were.

The filter I took out was lovely and clean, but seemed to be bone dry! So I wonder if somebody bunged a new one in just before I got it, and without bothering to oil it or didn't know he had too.

You're right about the brush, the manual says 'soak' in the 50/50 solution (with a brush).

The squeezing out the excess I must have got from somewhere else, most likely the Castrol foam filter oil instructions  ...


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Murphy's 4th law of motion states that any small object that is accidentally dropped will immediately hide itself under a larger object.
poldark
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« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2015, 15:59:36 »

I use a spray oil they're often coloured so you can be sure you've covered the entirety, this isn't what I have exactly, nor what I paid but gives you an idea.

http://www.splatshop.co.uk/putoline-air-filter-oil-aerosol.html
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« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2015, 17:53:38 »

It's the same filter set up as Beverly, I think the drain hole/cap is on the wrong side of the filter air box, and my engine side of the air box had some heavy oil on it, unable to drain into the collector, because it's on the wrong side. Of course I could be wrong, but I don't think so. My filter must have been over lubed, I'm sure it's now running better and giving better fuel economy, but I also put in a new plug and the latest design of NGK suppressor cap at the same time of doing the service.
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Dave Weller, Chatham
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« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2015, 21:01:20 »

Nice clean scoot 
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Mike H
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« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2015, 21:31:52 »

It's the same filter set up as Beverly, I think the drain hole/cap is on the wrong side of the filter air box, and my engine side of the air box had some heavy oil on it, unable to drain into the collector, because it's on the wrong side. Of course I could be wrong, but I don't think so. My filter must have been over lubed, I'm sure it's now running better and giving better fuel economy,

Don't forget the engine crankcase breather blows into the filter housing on the intake side, so that's what the 'heavy oil' is. And that's what was leaking out the join of mine onto the transmission case.

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Noggin the Nog
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« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2016, 18:42:28 »

A couple of points from having done this today.

I managed to do it without undoing any other bolts than the ones holding the cover on & one on the underside holding the side panel to the rear of the foot board.

The finger screws are captive &, while wriggling things about to move the cover out of the way, are not much of a problem. When putting the cover back it's the pointy ends of the screws that seem to get in the way & you need to keep pushing them back into the cover to clear the filter housing.

This thing about "heavy" oil within the filter housing.
I've read the manual a few times &, while it highlights the necessity to completely remove the filler cap & dipstsick  (bit obvious) it's not that clear as to whether the oil level is measured with the dipstick fully screwed home or  the base of the cap just resting on the lip of the engine casing. These are the two industry standard positions used by different manufacturers.
I once had the Guzzi overfilled by an authorised dealers mechanic who insisted that the level should always be measured with the cap just loosely sat on the filler hole. (he'd been serving Vauxhalls in their sister dealers the week before).
The Guzzi (same stable as Piaggio now anyway) should always be measured with the dipstick screwed fully in.
Overfilling led to oil very quickly appearing out of a slot in the bottom of the bell housing. I'm wondering if, on the X10, a little too much oil may lead to oil in the back of the filter housing.

I swapped out the existing filter for a new one & the old one looks like some small rodent has been chewing at the foam in the bottom right corner. Weird, huh? Not enough to wreck the filter but noticeable.
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« Reply #10 on: November 19, 2016, 21:28:59 »

I always do it as per fully screwed in. It's only a difference of about 10 - 12mm.

Yes the service manual reads like A. before every time the bike is ridden, in other words before you start it; B. you unscrew the dipstick and look at where the level is on it, presumably this implies as soon as it comes out, in other words you don't wipe it with a rag then redip it. Which is what those of us of a certain age will always do! 

Since engine is cold and not run yet then yes when first unscrewed, the level on stick will be clearly marked and corresponding to the position where cap was fully screwed in.

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Murphy's 4th law of motion states that any small object that is accidentally dropped will immediately hide itself under a larger object.
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